Exhibit Reveals Previously Unseen Shackleton Expedition Photos

Enduring Eye

One of the greatest-ever photographic records of human survival is on display in a new exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society in London, now through Feb. 28, 2016.

Honoring the achievements of Sir Ernest Shackleton and the men of the Endurance Expedition of 1914-1917, newly digitized images reveal previously unseen details of the crew’s epic struggle for survival both before and after their ship was destroyed.

At the heart of the exhibition are more than 90 high resolution images, taken by Shackleton’s official expedition photographer Frank Hurley, and saved by him under the most extreme circumstances to provide a lasting record of the men of the Endurance and their story.

For the first time, the fragile glass plate and celluloid negatives, stored securely at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) for more than 80 years, have been digitized directly from the originals. Now viewed at full definition, the images unlock the remarkable detail captured originally by Hurley in his photographic processing, including interior images of the Endurance and high resolution information of life on the pack ice of the Weddell Sea.

Click here to access an online exhibition that contains many of Hurley’s outstanding images


Jeff_BlumenfeldJeff Blumenfeld is the founder, publisher and editor of Expedition News, a monthly review of significant expeditions, research projects and newsworthy adventures. It is distributed online and by mail to media representatives, corporate sponsors, educators, research librarians, environmentalists and outdoor enthusiasts.

PDF Creator    Send article as PDF   

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

close comment popup

Leave A Reply